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WOW! USA Men World League Champions!

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WOW! USA Men World League Champions!

Posted on 21 July 2014 by Chuck Rey

The USA Men upset #1 ranked Brazil to win the FIVB World League Championships. As Cody Kessel called it, the Volleyball Superbowl! Unfortunately, my wedding was a week too early and we missed the opportunity to watch professional volleyball in Italy on our honeymoon in Florence.  I’ll have to be sure to let me new wife know that she should better plan things in the future icon wink WOW! USA Men World League Champions! volleyball Continue Reading

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Positive Coaching

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Positive Coaching

Posted on 16 June 2014 by Chuck Rey

The Harvard Business Review again supports my positive coaching style.

Positive Negative conversations Positive Coaching volleyball

 

 

The Neurochemistry of Positive Conversations

by Judith E. Glaser and Richard D. Glaser  |   11:00 AM June 12, 2014

Why do negative comments and conversations stick with us so much longer than positive ones?

A critique from a boss, a disagreement with a colleague, a fight with a friend – the sting from any of these can make you forget a month’s worth of praise or accord. If you’ve been called lazy, careless, or a disappointment, you’re likely to remember and internalize it. It’s somehow easier to forget, or discount, all the times people have said you’re talented or conscientious or that you make them proud.

Chemistry plays a big role in this phenomenon. When we face criticism, rejection or fear, when we feel marginalized or minimized, our bodies produce higher levels of cortisol, a hormone that shuts down the thinking center of our brains and activates conflict aversion and protection behaviors. We become more reactive and sensitive. We often perceive even greater judgment and negativity than actually exists. And these effects can last for 26 hours or more, imprinting the interaction on our memories and magnifying the impact it has on our future behavior. Cortisol functions like a sustained-release tablet – the more we ruminate about our fear, the longer the impact.

Positive comments and conversations produce a chemical reaction too. They spur the production of oxytocin, a feel-good hormone that elevates our ability to communicate, collaborate and trust others by activating networks in our prefrontal cortex. But oxytocin metabolizes more quickly than cortisol, so its effects are less dramatic and long-lasting.

This “chemistry of conversations” is why it’s so critical for all of us –especially managers – to be more mindful about our interactions. Behaviors that increase cortisol levels reduce what I call “Conversational Intelligence” or “C-IQ,” or a person’s ability to connect and think innovatively, empathetically, creatively and strategically with others. Behaviors that spark oxytocin, by contrast, raise C-IQ.

Over the past 30 years, I’ve helped leaders at companies including Boehringer Ingelheim, Clairol, Donna Karen, Exide Technologies, Burberry, and Coach learn to boost performance with better C-IQ. Recently, my consultancy, The CreatingWE Institute, also partnered with Ryan Smith, CEO of Qualtrics, the world’s largest online survey software company, to analyze the frequency of negative (cortisol-producing) versus positive (oxytocin-producing) interactions in today’s workplaces. We asked managers how often they engaged in several behaviors — some positive, and others negative — on a scale of 0 through 5, in which 0 was “never” and 5 was “always.”

The good news is that managers appear to be using positive, oxytocin and C-IQ elevating behaviors more often than negative behaviors. Survey respondents said that they exhibited all five positive behaviors, such as “showing concern for others” more frequently than all five negative ones, such as “pretending to be listening.” However, most respondents – approximately 85% — also admitted to “sometimes” acting in ways that could derail not only specific interactions but also future relationships. And, unfortunately, when leaders exhibit both types of behaviors it creates dissonance or uncertainty in followers’ brains, spurring cortisol production and reducing CI-Q.

Consider Rob, a senior executive from Verizon. He thought of himself as a “best practices” leader who told people what to do, set clear goals, and challenged his team to produce high quality results. But when one of his direct reports had a minor heart attack, and three others asked HR to move to be transferred off his team, he realized there was a problem.

Observing Rob’s conversational patterns for a few weeks, I saw clearly that the negative (cortisol-producing) behaviors easily outweighed the positive (oxytocin-producing) behaviors. Instead of asking questions to stimulate discussion, showing concern for others, and painting a compelling picture of shared success, his tendency was to tell and sell his ideas, entering most discussions with a fixed opinion, determined to convince others he was right. He was not open to others’ influence; he failed to listen to connect.

When I explained this to Rob, and told him about the chemical impact his behavior was having on his employees, he vowed to change, and it worked. A few weeks later, a member of his team even asked me: “What did you give my boss to drink?”

I’m not suggesting that you can’t ever demand results or deliver difficult feedback. But it’s important to do so in a way that is perceived as inclusive and supportive, thereby limiting cortisol production and hopefully stimulating oxytocin instead. Be mindful of the behaviors that open us up, and those that close us down, in our relationships. Harness the chemistry of conversations.

More blog posts by Judith E. Glaser and Richard D. Glaser

JUDITH E. GLASER

Judith E. Glaser is the CEO of Benchmark Communications and the chairman of The Creating WE Institute. She is the author of six books, including Creating WE (Platinum Press, 2005) and Conversational Intelligence (BiblioMotion, 2013), and a consultant to Fortune 500 companies.

RICHARD D. GLASER

Richard D. Glaser received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry and has worked in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries for his entire professional career. He is a founding member of The CreatingWE Institute.

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What matters most in coaching

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What matters most in coaching

Posted on 10 June 2014 by Chuck Rey

 What matters most in coaching volleyball

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks Vern Gambetta for his wisdom and insight into coaching longevity.

If I were writing this 30 or 40 years ago it would have been a very different blog post. I would have focused on technical knowledge, the importance of understanding training theory and the nuances of periodization. Don’t get me wrong all of that is important if you want to be a good coach, but if you want to be a great coach there is more to it than that. The technical part can be learned fairly easily through study, observation and practice. The difference makers are what some people would call the intangibles, the social and emotional intelligence that allows you to connect with you athletes, your colleagues, administrators and parents on another level.

Simply put it is mastery of communication skills.

All the knowledge in the world is for naught if you can’t communicate it. We coach people, people who respond to coaches who show they care about them as people. It is the little things that count, a smile, a pat on the back, an admonition to try harder or simply the tone of voice and body language when making a correction. I wish I would have figured this out earlier in my career. I can’t help but think about how much more effective I could have been as a coach and happier as a person. Learn from my mistakes, work on the intangibles raise your level of emotional and social intelligence to new heights, hone your communication skills to a fine edge and you will be the best coach you can be. That is all we can ask.

I’ve been fortunate to learn this from one of the best in the business in Head Coach Carolyn Condit here at Miami University. She is not only a master of communication skills, but also relationship skills. There are no books or words that can explain this form of mastery. It is experience and upbringing that molds a master coach.

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Volleyball Blogs

Volleyball Blogs

Posted on 13 May 2014 by Chuck Rey

USA Volleyball blog 300x109 Volleyball Blogs volleyball

Now that our spring season is done at Miami, I am catching up on life…and reading blogs. I always catch up on USA Volleyball’s John Kessel’s blog and have to return the props to John for his world-renowned Growing the Game Together blog. I’m humbled to be among some of these great minds and writers. It’s nice to see that I am making a difference to help grow our great game.  Guess this means I better also catch up on a few new posts that I now have time to write…oh and that chapter I need to finish up too (Jim Dietz).

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TSA Now Requires Proper Setting Form to Travel

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TSA Now Requires Proper Setting Form to Travel

Posted on 24 April 2014 by Chuck Rey

Security lines at the airport are a drag, but I do appreciate the new TSA rules that promotes volleyball millions of times a day worldwide.

20140424 121525 TSA Now Requires Proper Setting Form to Travel volleyball

Every time I get in the security booth, the agent tells me to put my hands up. Oh, I already know this form! This is the first time new airport security enforcement finally makes sense!

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Volleyball Nutrition Guide from the US Olympic Committee

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Volleyball Nutrition Guide from the US Olympic Committee

Posted on 18 April 2014 by Chuck Rey

USOC nutrition 300x163 Volleyball Nutrition Guide from the US Olympic Committee volleyballI’ve searched far and wide for good nutrition information for athletes. During my coaching days of club volleyball, I compiled information and created a volleyball nutrition guide (as reader friendly as possible for 16 year olds). To my surprise when I reached the collegiate ranks, coaches are often left to fend for themselves for good nutrition information for their teams. I used much of the information I gathered from the club days (as fundamental nutrition somewhat stays the same), modified it, and have learned learned pictures speak a thousand words. So my nutrition guides have more pictures and less words now icon smile Volleyball Nutrition Guide from the US Olympic Committee volleyball

Recently, I came across the USOC Nutrition page Resources and Fact Sheets that is a series of PDFs on specific nutrition information. It contains a good balance of pictures, charts, and words! I downloaded all the PDFs and combine them into one document. I have made it available for you here: USOC Nutrition Guide

There is also a great series of youtube videos with host Summer Sanders that includes the Senior USOC Sports Dietitian, Nanna Meyer among others:

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Specialization in Volleyball

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Specialization in Volleyball

Posted on 07 February 2014 by Chuck Rey

Matt Anderson skier 300x177 Specialization in Volleyball volleyballSpecialization in Volleyball is a big topic. Hugh McCutcheon wants players that are good in all six skills, but great at one or two skills. Doug Beal stated, “Great specialization always equals greater success.” Kessel always wrote a piece “Specialization is for Insect“. Wired Magazine just came out with an article that touches on specialization of a skier:

In the past, Nyman chased new ideas, grasping for something that would stick: new ski designs, different cardio training approaches, regimented sleep patterns. It was the opposite of a clear, focused approach. With so many moving parts, it was impossible to see what was really working, and the mental burden was overwhelming. A session with his psychologist crystallized the problem for Nyman: “He said, ‘I want you to listen to music, watch TV, and read a book all at the same time and tell me what happened in all three,’ and it really clicked with me, made it all simpler.” It’s all about accepting that he can’t control everything or be the best at every aspect of skiing, and using data to find a few differentiating factors that are most likely to give him a competitive advantage. “He’s tried all kinds of different ideas, at many different times, but this process is working,” Rearick says. “The science has helped him see what’s important.”

I want to be great at all things to all people. I realize this is impossible. As Bill Cosby says, “I don’t know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody.”

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Perfect 10 Stat Spreadsheets

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Perfect 10 Stat Spreadsheets

Posted on 19 January 2014 by Chuck Rey

Humbly, I’ve been overwhelmed with positive responses to Perfect 10 Stats. A few coaches have already implemented the idea into a practice setting and I’d love to learn how the session went using Perfect 10 Stats. It will be interesting to learn through a large sample size the median number for each skill to succeed. We are already familiar with the 3 Point Passing scale and the typical goal of at least a 2.0 for passers (depending on the level). I would like to know the goal for Digging (Don’t forget, the passing scale can be used for digging!), Setting, and Hitting. Then most importantly the cumulative Team goal (maybe a 6.2 per rotation to win a match?). Continue Reading

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Perfect 10 Statistics

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Perfect 10 Statistics

Posted on 14 January 2014 by Chuck Rey

Perfect 10 Statistics Perfect 10 Statistics volleyballStatistics in volleyball have come a long way, especially with the advancement of technology and the myriad of statistical softwares. After attending the AVCA Convention in Seattle and sitting-in on a few educational sessions, I’ve come to the realization that the statistical pendulum has swung too far. Coaches and players have become inundated with statistics to the point where it is overwhelming, time consuming and a resource hog. We are over-analyzing every movement to the point of paralysis. “Paralysis by analysis”.

Complex statistics has it’s place, for some coaches, but I believe statistics today are ultimately separating coaches and players. There are a few players that can grasp statistics, but a vast majority do not understand the true benefits. In addition, most players do not know how to correlate statistics and effectively apply them to improve a specific movement or skill (for that matter, many coaches do not know how to explain statistics in simplistic terms to better a player). Coaches are speaking Chinese to the Twitter-Americans. Continue Reading

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14 Volleyball Quotes for 2014

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14 Volleyball Quotes for 2014

Posted on 04 January 2014 by Chuck Rey

photo 32 237x300 14 Volleyball Quotes for 2014 volleyball

2013 ended with a bang in Seattle…congratulations to John Kessel for his induction to the AVCA Hall of Fame. Well deserved!

 

1. “Most change is evolutionary, not revolutionary. As we start a new year, let’s find the practicable and ‘celebrate-able’; let’s stay congruent with our messaging, creative in our efficiency, and, most of all, let’s give ourselves new opportunities to dream.” ~ Kathy DeBoer

2. “To be true to one’s self is the ultimate test in life. To have the courage and sensitivity to follow your hidden dreams and stand tall against the odds that are bound to fall in your path. Life is too short and precious to be dealt with in any other fashion.” ~ Flo Hyman Continue Reading

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AVCA Seattle – Minnesota Connection

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AVCA Seattle – Minnesota Connection

Posted on 17 December 2013 by Chuck Rey

20131217 1721301 AVCA Seattle   Minnesota Connection volleyball

So my Minnesota layover found me following a woman, who I swore was Lindsey Berg from behind. Lindsey is known for her high fashion and this woman was decked-out like Lindsey might be going out on the town. I wouldn’t assume Lindsey would travel in such attire, but I wanted to say hello. As this woman walked into the convenience shop, she spun around and it certainly wasn’t Lindsey. Heck, I haven’t a clue if Lindsey is even living in Minneapolis, but she has been to Convention a few times and thought it might be her. I’m sure my fiancé doesn’t appreciate me following women around icon wink AVCA Seattle   Minnesota Connection volleyball Continue Reading

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The Wrist Snap / Topspin on USA Volleyball

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The Wrist Snap / Topspin on USA Volleyball

Posted on 30 July 2013 by Chuck Rey

volleyball wrist snap topspin The Wrist Snap / Topspin on USA Volleyball volleyballHopefully, John Kessel won’t read this post because then he’ll realize I missed his blog post of a year ago. Google Analytics is amazing in that I was able to track referrals to my blog from USA Volleyball’s website. It stems from a great interaction between John, Peter Vint (USA Olympic Committee Research Scientist) and myself. Ironically, Peter Vint was getting his PhD at Arizona State University while I was playing there. He performed a body fat % test (among actual volleyball tests) on me back in the day and who’d a thunk it that he would become a lead scientist for the USOC?

Anyway, here is a good exchange about the myth of the volleyball wrist snap and how we really don’t get on top of the ball. It’s actually where we contact the ball (over the center of mass) that creates topspin on a volleyball.

http://www.teamusa.org/USA-Volleyball/Features/2012/July/20/STOP-Teaching-Hitting.aspx

Good stuff…

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One Month in at Miami Volleyball

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One Month in at Miami Volleyball

Posted on 21 March 2013 by Chuck Rey

What do you do after you land the job and actually arrive on campus? Hold your breath and hang on for the ride.

Coach Chuck Rey Miami Volleyball One Month in at Miami Volleyball volleyballIs it the journey or the destination? I sometimes ponder this question when recruiting players. Is it simply their goal to earn a college scholarship and be satisfied with that achievement or does that player truly want to succeed on the collegiate level? I have found that some high school players have reached their goal of getting to college and are almost distraught when they realize getting to college was the easy part, excelling in college will take a lot of hard work.

When you finally land that new assistant coach job, is it about the journey or the destination? For me, it’s always been about the journey. I’ve often referred to the Chinese proverb, “The journey is the reward” throughout my blog.

What’s the first month like on a new job? Awesome, overwhelming, crazy, time consuming, flattering, humbling, and all that I could have imagined and more. Here’s is what to expect, at least from my perspective… Continue Reading

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Online NCAA Volleyball Bracket

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Online NCAA Volleyball Bracket

Posted on 29 November 2012 by Chuck Rey

Northwestern Mutual Volleyball NCAA Online NCAA Volleyball Bracket volleyballThe NCAA has partnered with Northwestern Mutual for the first online NCAA Bracket! Enter for a chance at a $500 gift certificate of NCAA gear.

Click for the bracket http://ow.ly/f3WEk

 

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Coach Chuck Rey is Assistant Coach at Miami University


Prior to this position, he was Assistant Coach at Winthrop University, the University of Minnesota and Georgia Southern University.

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